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Psilocybin

- develop brain, mind and heart

Psychedelic drugs have always been associated with deep and transformative experiences. From the spiritual journeys of shamans with ayahuasca to the counterculture's turn on, tune in and drop out 'movement in the' 60s with LSD. And now, in the new millennium, where the psychedelic drugs are again in focus, in relation to psychotherapy and in the treatment of disorders such as depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD and addiction.

Psilocybin mushrooms, also known as magic mushrooms or just shrooms, are a group of fungi that contain the hallucinogenic substance psilocybin, which turns into psilocin upon ingestion. Psilocybin are often brewed as a tea or prepared with food to mask its bitter taste. Manufacturers also crush dried mushrooms into a powder and prepare them in capsule form.
Psilocybin works by activating receptors, most often in the prefrontal cortex, which is the part of the brain that affects mood, cognition and perception.

The experience of consuming magic mushrooms varies, and depends on the amount of psilocybin and expectations to the experience. 

Microdosing
Psychedelics

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Psychedelic drugs have always been associated with deep and transformative experiences. From the spiritual journeys of shamans with ayahuasca to the counterculture's turn on, tune in and drop out 'movement in the' 60s with LSD. And now, in the new millennium, where the psychedelic drugs are again in focus, in relation to psychotherapy and in the treatment of disorders such as depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD and addiction.

Psilocybin mushrooms, also known as magic mushrooms or just shrooms, are a group of fungi that contain the hallucinogenic substance psilocybin, which turns into psilocin upon ingestion. Psilocybin are often brewed as a tea or prepared with food to mask its bitter taste. Manufacturers also crush dried mushrooms into a powder and prepare them in capsule form.
Psilocybin works by activating receptors, most often in the prefrontal cortex, which is the part of the brain that affects mood, cognition and perception.

The experience of consuming magic mushrooms varies, and depends on the amount of psilocybin and expectations to the experience. 

The phenomenon has been known since the 1980s, especially in high-performance sports environments, but was defined as a term in 2011 by Dr MD. James Fadiman. In recent years, the trend has spread in all directions; from creativity booster in tech environments to motivation-promoting personal development and as an alternative assistance to improve disorders such as anxiety and depression.

Microdosing is a fast growing trend, particularly among entrepreneurs, artists and generally among people with an interest in improving themselves. The idea of microdosing is to ingest a very small dose of that psychedelic drug. So small that the effect is below the perceptual limit. That is to say; so small a dose that as such you do not feel any effect from the drug you are consuming, but still should be able to notice a subtle improvement in terms of mood, productivity, focus, presence and creativity.


Microdosing is still predominantly a process and a project carried out by the individual, rather than by health scientists. The established science has only recently begun to revisit the potential of psychedelic drugs, and thus also the phenomenon of microdosing.

 

Why Microdosing?

Have you ever considered living as the best version of yourself and living out your full potential? Or are there layers of life and your consciousness that you do not have access to?

That question has over time fascinated and inspired many and especially the relationship between how we think and how we live is interesting. Research shows that things are connected: What you say, what you do and who you think you are, are deeply related to the way you think and feel.

The neural network in the brain creates your thoughts. Thoughts become words. Words become action. Action turns into behavior. Behavior turns into character and personality.

So the next question that stands out is: Can you break your patterns and change your brain to think differently?

The brain is like play dough

Simply put, the brain and its neural network function a bit like playing dough. Just when it comes out of the box, it is completely soft and malleable. This phenomenon is called neuroplasticity - a fine word for "malleable brain". As children and young people, we have extremely high neuroplasticity. Our brain shapes and adapts as we learn and adapt to the world we were born into.

 

As time goes on, the play dough becomes more stiff and hard. It's getting harder and harder to model. And in some places it can almost seem as if it has turned to stone. Our brains behave the same way. Our ways of thinking, our attitudes and our reaction patterns become firm and effective. The brain becomes a super-adapted sculpture - hyper-efficient to act in the world - and the life - we live in.

But our brains do not always adapt to the best conditions.

Childhood failure, the experience of a trauma as an adult, prolonged periods of stress or depression or acquired bad habits can create obstacles.

In other words: maybe your formerly so soft play dough is dried into not so lucky folds and patterns, and it's hard to change bad habits, get over the irrational anger, or get out of anxious thoughts.

Psychedelics makes the brain malleable

Psychedelic drugs have the ability to take us outside our usual frame of reference and enable us to see ourselves from the outside, and for a while think differently about ourselves and the life we ​​live. An experience that often brings insight and motivation to improving changes of a personal nature.

 

Research has also concluded that intake of psychedelic drugs puts the brain in a state of neuroplasticity. Meaning that it is possible, under psychedelic influence, even in micro doses, to model your "play dough" again.

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